Sunday, March 31, 2019

Playing with VirtualBox linked-clones

Have been experimenting with rapid deployment of cloned VMs and having some fun. Using VirtualBox's linked clone feature, I can create and start 30 instances to Kali Linux (30 being the number of classroom seats) in a matter of seconds. I've also worked out how to push new network configuration onto each instance. In-progress notes are on the TC4 internal Gitea server. Will also post 'em to Github when things are further along.

There's a bunch of other things to figure out and instantiate but they'll have to go on the "to do" list. Have signed up for my second season in the NCLs. Not sure if I'll be competing remotely (separate from the class), but I want to do better than last year. This means working through the harder parts of the gym, which opened a few days ago.

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

undefined reference to "show_hash"

Note to self: when compiling older software, the fix for the "undefined reference to 'show_hash'" error appears to be "apt-get install uthash-dev". That, or libhashkit-dev, but I believe that it's the uthash-dev library.

Monday, January 28, 2019

Chrome and xclip

Have been watching a number of crackme-type walk-throughs, where the speaker relies heavily on xclip to capture a command line output so that the mouse can be used to paste data into the browser. I could never get it to work with Chrome, until today. To use xclip with Chrome, add the following to ~/.bashrc (or .bash_aliases if you have it): alias xclip="xclip -selection clipboard" After that, it should work as expected.

Thursday, January 10, 2019

My VLAN beef

After all these years, why is it that pundits still associate use of VLANs with security? Any security afforded by use of a VLAN is a side effect and is considered (by those in security) as not assurable (e.g., it cannot be proven by testing), is easily broken, and is very easily mis-configured.

A VLAN is a traffic management tool, designed to increase overall (employable) bandwidth in an architecture. It does not employ authentication or encryption. Security is increased (often negligibly) by ensuring that traffic doesn't "go" somewhere. In some architectures (e.g., VoIP phones on the same network segments as the workstations), this separation doesn't exist.